Los Alamos National Laboratory

Los Alamos National Laboratory

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Los Alamos in the News

Read about what other news sources are saying about Los Alamos science achievements.

All Los Alamos in the News

  • What cosmology tells us about quantum mechanics

    Science on the Hill: Protecting grid from cataclysmic solar storm

    Los Alamos has been studying space weather for more than 50 years as part of its national security mission to monitor nuclear testing around the globe, and part of that work includes studying how the radiation-saturated environment of near space can affect technology and people.

    - 2/12/17
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    EDGE bioinformatics brings genomics to everyone

    A new bioinformatics platform called Empowering the Development of Genomics Expertise (EDGE) will help democratize the genomics revolution by allowing users with limited bioinformatics expertise to quickly analyze and interpret genomic sequence data... - 11/29/16

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    Los Alamos honored for industry collaboration in 2016 HPCwire awards

    Los Alamos has been recognized with an HPCwire Readers’ and Editors’ Choice Award for the Lab’s collaboration with Seagate on next-generation data storage technologies.. - 11/16/16

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    Using Wikipedia to forecast the flu

    Forecasting the impact of not just the flu, but other infectious—and preventable—diseases such as HIV and measles could allow public health workers to focus on mitigation strategies and potentially save millions of lives around the world... - 11/15/16

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    Exascale Computing Project announces $48 million to establish four exascale co-design centers

    The Department of Energy’s Exascale Computing Project (ECP)announced that it has selected four co-design centers as part of a 4 year, $48 million funding award... - 11/11/16

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    Fires set to clear African land are stoking climate change

    Each year in the dry season, flames sweep across a large swath of the African countryside, engulfing every kind of grass and woody plant in their way... - 11/13/16

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    Smoking causes extensive damage to DNA

    Study shows hundreds of mutations in every lung cell after one year - 11/3/16

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    LANL captures multiple R&D 100 Awards

    R&D 100, the national magazine of research and development, named the winners of its 2016 technology innovation awards... - 11/16

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    Fires set to clear African land are stoking climate change

    Each year in the dry season, flames sweep across a large swath of the African countryside, engulfing every kind of grass and woody plant in their way... - 11/16

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    Humans on Mars

    Nuclear reactor test in Nevada could make a Mars trip reality - 11/16

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    The Pope of Physics

    All about Fermi - 11/16

  • watercolor by Abbott Handerson Thayer

    Outsmarting the art of camouflage

    It’s not just soldiers that use camouflage to blend into their surroundings. Facilities and the movement of people and equipment can be camouflaged. These can present significant challenges to the military. How can we see what doesn’t want to be seen? - 11/7/16

  • mars spaceship

    Curiosity rover finds weird 'egg rock' meteorite on Mars

    NASA's Mars rover Curiosity stumbled upon a dark grey, golf-ball-size object last week that looks nothing like the typical red-orange rocks that are normally seen on Mars. - 11/7/16

  • Quantum-dot solar windows evolve with 'doctor-blade' spreading

    Quantum-dot solar windows evolve with 'doctor-blade' spreading

    Los Alamos scientists report on large LSC windows created using the "doctor-blade" technique for depositing thin layers of a dot/polymer composite on top of commercial large-area glass slab. - 11/4/16

  •  Los Alamos disease-fighting technology showing promise

    Los Alamos disease-fighting technology showing promise

    A pathogen-carrying pest known as the glassy-winged sharpshooter has plagued grape vines in California for more than century, but a new technology from Los Alamos National Laboratory could change that. - 11/4/16

  • CubeSats could soon be zooming around space under their own power

    CubeSats could soon be zooming around space under their own power

    Los Alamos researchers have created and tested a safe and innovative rocket motor concept that could soon see CubeSats zooming around space and even steering themselves back to Earth when they're finished their mission. - 11/4/16

  • This 3D image taken at Los Alamos National Laboratory by x-ray tomography shows an experimental fuel cell membrane electrode assembly.

    On track for a clean, hydrogen-powered future 

    Los Alamos, within the ElectroCat consortium, is investigating less expensive, more abundant materials based on carbon compounds to reduce the cost of ownership of a fuel-cell powered car so this clean power can compete in the marketplace. - 10/13/16

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    Feeling the burn: Understanding how biomass burning changes climate

    When black carbon from fires is released into the atmosphere, it can mean bad news for the climate. At least half of the black carbon in the atmosphere is a result of biomass burning. - 9/27/16

  • The Colville River runs across northern Alaska.

    Arctic river flood plains are home to hidden carbon

    In the race to account for how carbon moves through Arctic ecosystems, especially as they warm, scientists may be overlooking one major component: river flood plains. - 9/27/16

  • Paul Johnson of Geophysics (EES-17)

    Trinity ushers in new age of supercomputing < 

    As the Lab begins testing the second half of its new supercomputer, Trinity, the occasion highlights how intertwined scientific breakthroughs and computer innovations have become — and what a seminal and central role Los Alamos has played in that synergy. - 9/12/16

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    Lab Director McMillan testifies before Congress

    Watch the video below. - 9/8/16

  • Los Alamos to investigate solar dangers to the power grid

    Los Alamos to investigate solar dangers to the power grid

    The Lab launches a new investigation of how solar events could affect a grid like a long string of Christmas lights—increasingly long and susceptible to a cascade of problems. - 8/22/16

  • Cube sats in space.

    Tiny satellites: latest innovation hedge funds are using

    The latest technological innovation for data-hungry hedge funds is a fleet of five dozen shoebox-sized satellites. - 8/22/16

  • Molecule

    Isotope research opens new possibilities for cancer treatment

    A new study at LANL and in collaboration with Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource greatly improves scientists’ understanding of the element actinium whose short offers opportunity for new alpha-emitting drugs to treat cancer. - 8/22/16

  • Turning windows into solar generators

    Turning windows into solar generators 

    A simple filtration process helped Rice University researchers create flexible, wafer-scale films of highly aligned and closely packed carbon nanotubes. - 8/8/16

  • Rover on Mars now picks its own laser targets

    Rover on Mars now picks its own laser targets

    If you find yourself on Mars anytime soon, beware: there’s a rover exploring its surface, and it now has the ability to choose its own targets for its onboard laser—and even fire it autonomously. - 8/1/16

  • How a weird Mars rock may be solid proof of an ancient oxygen atmosphere

    How a weird Mars rock may be solid proof of an ancient oxygen atmosphere

    When researchers found a compound that shouldn't have been there, it revealed a missing piece of Mars' history. - 8/1/16

  • Nanotubes “Line-Up” to form films for flexible electronics

    How a pinch of dirt can tell you everything about a nuclear test

    Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have just discovered a fascinating new way to reconstruct past nuclear tests even decades after detonation. All they need is a pinch of dirt. - 7/18/16

  • A helicopter drops fire retardant on wildfire during 2011 Las Conchas fire in New Mexico.

    Burning questions in study of wildfire

    Understanding what drives big fires and predicting their behavior helps the fire community prepare for the next blaze through appropriate land management, emergency plans and firefighting strategies. - 7/12/16

  • Glen Wurden, a plasma physicist at Los Alamos has conceived a comet-buster that would work like this: Harnessing the tremendous energy of fusion, the process in which two atomic nuclei collide to form a new nucleus, could propel a rocket to more than 100 kilometers per second.

    A fusion-powered rocket to deflect deadly comets 

    Glen Wurden, a plasma physicist at Los Alamos has conceived a comet-buster that would work like this: Harnessing the tremendous energy of fusion, the process in which two atomic nuclei collide to form a new nucleus, could propel a rocket to more than 100 kilometers per second. - 6/27/16

  • Although neutrinos are extremely abundant, it took 26 years for scientists to confirm their existence. In the 60 years since the neutrino’s discovery, we’ve slowly learned about this intriguing particle.

    The neutrino turns 60

    Although neutrinos are extremely abundant, it took 26 years for scientists to confirm their existence. In the 60 years since the neutrino’s discovery, we’ve slowly learned about this intriguing particle. - 6/20/16

  • Science on the Hill: Fragile life underfoot has big impact on desert

    Science on the Hill: Fragile life underfoot has big impact on desert

    Anyone who spends time in the high-desert landscape of Northern New Mexico has come across biological soil crusts, or biocrusts. This fragile crust fills a pivotal ecosystem niche. However, its survival is being challenged by threats from climate change and man-made disturbance. - 6/13/16

  • Mars

    Hunt for high-energy photons takes place from a mountaintop in Mexico

    A new telescope built from water tanks might help answer some of the biggest questions in astronomy. - 6/12/16

  • Mars

    New tech fights fires before they start

    One spark, and like a monster with an unquenchable appetite, a wildfire can burn forests, homes and towns. That's reason enough for the invention of the brand new Simtable, which is being used at Los Alamos National Lab. - 6/12/16

  • Mars

    Space technology can help sustain Earth 

    Satellite imagery and communication are powerful aids in confronting humanitarian and environmental issues - 6/12/16

  • Nevada Test Site

    Los Alamos staff help improve U.S. capability to detect underground nuclear explosions

    Team demonstrates advanced capability to help identify whether state or non-state actors are hiding low-yield nuclear testing to develop or improve nuclear weapons. - 6/5/16

  • manganese oxide

    Revealing the nature of magnetic interactions in manganese oxide

    Revealing the mechanism of 'superexchange' - 5/24/16

  • Mars

    Rare-earth-free magnet made from cheap materials

    Researchers create a powerful permanent magnet out of iron and nitrogen as part of a program to cut the need for rare-earth metals - 5/17/16

  • perovskite team

    Cooling, time in the dark preserve perovskite solar power

    Build-up of unwanted charge found to sap photocurrent - 5/17/16

  • Mars

    New design strategy reduces time and cost of material discovery

    Iteratively guiding experiments toward finding materials with the desired target properties - 5/17/16

  • Mars

    First burst buffer use at scale bolsters application performance

    Bolstering I/O capabilities began with Trinity at Los Alamos - 5/16/16

  • KRQE News: New Mexico scientists develop tiny, artificial lung

    New Mexico scientists develop tiny, artificial lung

    New Mexico researchers are creating an artificial lung, known as PuLMo for Pulmonary Lung Model. - 5/12/16

  • Science on the Hill: Gravitational waves open new window on universe

    Gravitational waves open new window on universe

    Viewing the very large and very small workings of what's out there. - 5/8/16

  • Mars

    What would happen if GPS failed?

    Fourteen years ago, a team at Los Alamos built a spoofer by modifying a GPS signal simulator - 5/6/16

  • Water telescope’s first sky map shows flickering black holes

    Water telescope’s first sky map shows flickering black holes

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov observatory has released its first map of the sky, including the first measurements of how often black holes flicker on and off. It has also caught pulsars, supernova remnants, and other bizarre cosmic beasts. - 4/24/16

  • Nanotubes “Line-Up” to form films for flexible electronics

    Nanotubes “line-up” to form films for flexible electronics

    A simple filtration process helped Rice University researchers create flexible, wafer-scale films of highly aligned and closely packed carbon nanotubes. - 4/10/16

  • Science on the Hill: Why space weather matters

    Why space weather matters

    Many people think of space as a silent, empty void and the sun as a distant source of light and heat. Not true. The sun and the Earth are connected in complex, intimate and sometimes dangerous ways. - 4/10/16

  •  Ice throughout the Arctic is vanishing due to a rapidly warming climate.

    Melting of ice wedges adds to arctic warming

    New ways of looking at seismic information and innovative laboratory experiments are offering tantalizing clues to what triggers earthquakes—and when. - 3/14/16

  • Paul Johnson of Geophysics (EES-17)

    Can we someday predict earthquakes?

    New ways of looking at seismic information and innovative laboratory experiments are offering tantalizing clues to what triggers earthquakes — and when. - 3/14/16

  • More than 60 Los Alamos National Laboratory staff instrumental in the success of the Prometheus project were honored Monday with the Secretary of Energy Achievement Award at a special ceremony in Los Alamos.

    Los Alamos ‘Cube Sat’ team wins Secretary's Award

    More than 60 Los Alamos National Laboratory staff instrumental in the success of the Prometheus project were honored Monday with the Secretary of Energy Achievement Award at a special ceremony in Los Alamos. - 3/6/16

  • Human-gorilla divergence may have occurred two million years earlier than thought (Photo : Flickr: Wikipedia)

    Fossil gorilla and Africa: Humans likely evolved earlier than thought, researchers say

    Scientists recently unearthed 8 million-year-old gorilla fossils from the Chorora Formation in Ethiopia, which indicate the human evolutionary split took place 10 million years ago. - 2/19/16

  • Human-gorilla divergence may have occurred two million years earlier than thought (Photo : Flickr: Rod Waddington)

    Better Greenland, Antarctica sheet modeling helps predict sea-level rise

    The Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets will make a dominant contribution to twenty-first century sea-level rise if current climate trends continue, studied in a five-year project called Predicting Ice Sheet and Climate Evolution at Extreme Scales (PISCEES) - 2/19/16

  • big data illustration

    Any company can study user behavior with a data lake

    The darling of Big Data, Hadoop, having its 10th birthday on January 28th, 2016. - 2/15/16

  • solar panel windows

    Turning windows into solar panels

    Working with quantum dots, researchers achieve a breakthrough in solar-concentrating technology that can turn windows into electric generators. - 2/7/16

  • hot cell facility

    Isotopes for cancer and cardiac care

    Eva Birnbaum is interviewed on KSFR radio on the Lab's Isotope Program - 2/4/16

  • Lanza

    Confessions of a meteorite hunter

    Picking meteorites up off of the Antarctic ice - 1/29/16

  • gridded earth

    The quest to predict severe weather sooner

    MPAS aims to be next-generation global weather model - 1/29/16

  • van allen belts

    NASA's Van Allen probes revolutionize view of radiation belts

    A study conducted by Los Alamos and the New Mexico Consortium reveals that the shape of the Van Allen Belts is actually quite different than previously believed. - 1/21/16

  • ASSASN

    Superluminous supernova is the brightest ever seen

    Machine-learning technology developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory helps power ASAS-SN, providing the software that picks out these events from the images the project spots. - 1/15/16

  • Nina Lanza

    Hunting space rocks on blue ice

    Nina Lanza is studying the solar system by spending six weeks on an ice sheet in Antarctica. The 36-year-old staff scientist at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico is on a treasure hunt of sorts. - 1/15/16

  • Forecasting flu

    The forecast calls for flu

    Using mathematics, computer programs, statistics and information about how disease develops and spreads, a research team at Los Alamos National Laboratory found a way to forecast the flu season and even next week’s sickness trends. - 1/15/16

  • Mars landscape

    Mars Rover finds changing rocks, surprising scientists

    As NASA’s Curiosity rover treks up a three-mile-high mountain on Mars, the rocks are changing. Back on Earth, scientists analyzing the data realized this was something different: It turned out to be the first of the high-silica rocks. - 12/24/15

  • Dying conifers, particularly ponderosa pine and sugar pine

    Scientists say climate change could cause a ‘massive’ tree die-off in the U.S. Southwest

    In a troubling new study says a warming climate could trigger a “massive” dieoff of coniferous trees in the U.S. southwest sometime this century. - 12/24/15

  • Man sneezing

    Our view: Vaccinate now, prevent flu later

    Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists are predicting that this winter’s flu season is most likely to peak in February across much of the United States. The scientists can say this because of the model they have constructed. - 12/24/15

  • LANL scientist Richard Sayre

    Driving toward an algae-powered future

    A new research project led by Los Alamos National Laboratory seeks to drive algal biofuels to marketability, decreasing our nation’s dependence on fossil fuels and putting the brakes on global warming. - 12/24/15

  • Los Alamos physicist Eva Birnbaum

    Los Alamos turns its nuclear weapons power to war on cancer

    Los Alamos Physicist Eva Birnbaum shows how the laboratory is manufacturing a radioactive treatment that targets tumors, without killing the surrounding healthy tissue. - 12/20/15

  • Science in 60: Lanza describes meteorite hunt in Antarctica

    Lanza describes meteorite hunt in Antarctica

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has unveiled a video where they challenged staff scientist Nina Lanza of LANL’s Space and Remote Sensing group describe her upcoming trip to Antarctica to hunt for meteorites in just 60 seconds. - 12/11/15

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    Satellite imaging startup takes step forward

    A Los Alamos startup that uses satellite images to decipher changes on the Earth's surface has received a new round of venture capital. - 12/6/15

  • water

    Quenching New Mexico's thirst with brackish water

    Whether today turns out damp or dry, drought is a fact of life in New Mexico. So where can we get more water? - 11/15/15

  • Capping methane leaks a win-win

    Capping methane leaks a win-win

    As special correspondent Kathleen McCleery explains, that’s why both environmentalists and the energy industry are trying to find ways to capture leaks from oil and gas facilities. - 11/13/15

  • Illustration of a binary neutron star system in the process of merging. The remnant formed by this merger could be either a neutron star or a black hole, determining whether it launches a gamma-ray burst. [NASA]

    What do you get when two neutron stars merge?

    Led by Chris Fryer of the University of Arizona and the Los Alamos National Laboratory, a group of researchers undertook a highly collaborative study to better understand the fates of NS–NS mergers. - 11/8/15

  • Tiny magnets could work in sensors, information encoding

    Tiny magnets could work in sensors, information encoding   

    Scientists have realized a nanoscale, artificial magnet by arranging an array of magnetic nano-islands along a geometry that is not found in natural magnets. - 11/1/15

  • Decision Science

    Decision Sciences’ multi-mode Passive Detection System: Rapid scanning for radiological threats 

    The ability to identify distinct material density enables the Multi-Mode Passive Detection System (MMPDS)to quickly detect unshielded to heavily shielded nuclear threats, as well as gamma rays, with near-zero false alarms. - 11/1/15

  • Jumpstarting the carbon capture industry: Science on the Hill

    Jumpstarting the carbon capture industry 

    Carbon capture, utilization, and storage can provide a crucial bridge between our current global energy economy and a cleaner, more diversified energy future. Researchers demonstrate that this approach is technically feasible and poised for full-scale roll-out. - 10/16/15

  • Lab scientist says ‘The Martian’ mostly accurate

    New Mexico scientist says 'The Martian' mostly accurate 

    “What’s so impressive is so much of it is really accurate,” Lanza said. “All of my Mars nerd friends you know we just — we love this because it uses real science from today… not future magic science.” - 10/11/15

  • Weird quantum fluctuations of empty space—maybe

    Weird quantum fluctuations of empty space—maybe

    Empty space is anything but, according to quantum mechanics: Instead, it roils with quantum particles flitting in and out of existence. Now, a team of physicists claims it has measured those fluctuations directly, without disturbing or amplifying them. - 10/11/15

  • Los Alamos physicists developed a quantum random number generator and a quantum communication system, both of which exploit the weird and immutable laws of quantum physics to improve cybersecurity.

    For cybersecurity, in quantum encryption we trust

    Los Alamos physicists developed a quantum random number generator and communication system that exploits quantum physics to improve cybersecurity. - 9/13/15

  •  Domestic corn production will be 13.34 billion bushels, Descartes Labs forecast. Source: Descartes Labs via Bloomberg

    Corn crop conditions seen worsening in satellite images

    U.S. corn production is 2.8 percent smaller than government estimates, according to a daily analysis of infrared satellite images taken of more than 1 million corn fields. - 9/13/15

  •  Albuquerque Journal: Brewing a better, healthier beer

    Entrepreneurs, Los Alamos scientist seek fusion of another sort

    With help from a Los Alamos National Laboratory scientist, three young Santa Fe entrepreneurs are trying to brew a better beer – one that combines the professed health effects of kombucha fermented tea with the enjoyment derived from drinking an ice-cold adult beverage. - 9/13/15

  • R&D Magazine: Windows into Solar Power Sources with Quantum Dots

    Windows into solar power sources with quantum dots 

    A luminescent solar concentrator is an emerging sunlight harvesting technology that has the potential to disrupt the way we think about energy: It could turn any window into a daytime power source. - 8/30/15

  • NPR: Particles From The Edge Of Space Shine A Light On Fukushima

    Particles From the edge of space shine a light on Fukushima

    It's one of the greatest, and most disturbing, questions of the Fukushima disaster: What happened to the nuclear fuel inside the plant? Now physicists are trying to shed some light on the problem using particles from the edge of space. - 8/30/15

  • portable mri

    Portable MRI might make the world a better place

    Los Alamos' Battlefield MRI uses ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging to create images of the brain that can be used in field hospitals or in remote villages. - 8/9/15

  • Fast Company covers

    Just your typical New Mexico image recognition startup spun off from a government lab

    Far from Silicon Valley, Descartes Labs aims to turn a national research facility's AI research into new ways of understanding the world. - 7/30/15

  • methane map

    Methane cloud hunting

    Los Alamos researchers go hunting for methane gas over the Four Corners area of northwest New Mexico and find a strange daily pattern. - 7/12/15

  •  A hole in the ice of a frozen lake near Chelyabinsk, Russia, in 2013 after a 7,000-ton meteoroid exploded over the city. Credit Sergei Ilnitsky/European Pressphoto Agency

    Agencies, hoping to deflect comets and asteroids, step up Earth defense

    In grappling with the threat of doomsday rocks from outer space, Hollywood has always been far ahead of the federal government, cranking out thrillers full of swashbuckling heroes, rockets and nuclear blasts that save the planet. - 6/26/15

  • New Mexico’s role in the next mission to Mars will also be part of a tri-national Earthly collaboration, officials say

    Earth plus Mars: Los Alamos National Lab partners with Spain and France

    New Mexico’s role in the next mission to Mars will also be part of a tri-national Earthly collaboration, officials say. - 6/26/15

  • Scientific American

    Tall trees sucked dry by global warming

    Climate change will challenge tall trees like California's redwoods. - 6/7/15

  • March 1, 2015 Los Alamos biomedical scientist Harshini Mukundan.  Los Alamos biomedical scientist Harshini Mukundan

    Rapid diagnosis a new weapon against re-emerging TB

    Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed an innovative tool set for the early and accurate diagnosis of tuberculosis. - 6/7/15

  • The New York Times covers National Labs Race to Stop Iran

    National labs race to stop Iran

    Given the stakes in the sensitive negotiations [with Iran], the labs would check and recheck one another, making sure the answers held up. - 5/15/15

  • image description

    Landscapes we don't want to lose

    Nate McDowell, a tree physiologist in New Mexico, explains how a warming climate is irreversibly altering an ancient ecosystem. - 5/15/15

  • image description

    New technique may make solar panel production less expensive

    Scientists have developed a more efficient method of creating the material that makes solar panels work, according to a report published this week, which researchers say could be key to creating clean global energy in the future. - 4/24/15

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    The fate of trees: How climate change may alter forests worldwide

    By the end of the century, the woodlands of the Southwest will likely be reduced to weeds and shrubs. And scientists worry that the rest of the planet may see similar effects. - 3/26/15