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National Outreach Traveling Exhibits Program (NOTEs)

The Bradbury Science Museum designs and creates free, visually captivating and highly interactive traveling exhibits based on world-changing research from Los Alamos National Laboratory.

October 26, 2020
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Local teens explore the world of viruses in Building Immunity, a traveling exhibit based on the research of Bette Korber, a Theoretical Biologist at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  • Program Administrator
  • Stacy Baker
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Let's Partner!

If you would like to schedule one of our free exhibits to show at your venue, or to travel with other exhibits you manage, we would love to hear from you. If you are interested in collaborating or creating partnerships with either the Bradbury Science Museum or the Lab’s scientific community, we would be happy to pursue those opportunities, as well.

To schedule one of these exhibits, please contact us at bsm-notes@lanl.gov.

NOTEs—The Basics
  • These exhibits are available to borrow for free to approved venues.
  • Each exhibit requires only a 10’ x 10’ footprint and sets up in under an hour.
  • Each exhibit includes activities and educational materials for students.
  • Each exhibit is available for a 4-6 month loan.
  • Each exhibit needs only one standard electrical outlet.
  • Each exhibit includes promotional materials.
  • Each exhibit ships in ATA containers, with logistics handled on our end.

Let's Partner!

If you would like to schedule one of our free exhibits to show at your venue, or to travel with other exhibits you manage, we would love to hear from you. If you are interested in collaborating or creating partnerships with either the Bradbury Science Museum or the Lab’s scientific community, we would be happy to pursue those opportunities, as well.

To schedule one of these exhibits, please contact us at bsm-notes@lanl.gov or at (505) 695-6615.

The Ribosome

The Ribosome — An interactive, walk-through exhibit with augmented reality that allows the guest to "enter the ribosome" and watch proteins being made! On the exterior, visitors can explore what a ribosome is and why it’s so important to fighting diseases. They can learn about the cutting-edge work of understanding protein synthesis—which can lead to new antibiotics, cancer therapies, and treating genetic diseases—and how supercomputing enables this work. Curated by Karissa Sanbomnatsu, the exhibit is a visually stunning interpretation of the ribosome, its behaviors and the great promise it holds for fighting diseases like cancer.

Three pictures of the Ribosome traveling exhibit.

Building Immunity

Building Immunity — An Ideum touch table invites users on a self-guided journey to explore the world of viruses, vaccines and immunity and discover the history of understanding and creating therapies against HIV and influenza. Based on research Bette Korber, this exhibit is also available as a plug and play flash drive for venues with their own compatible Ideum touch tables!

Teens explore Building Immunity in the Research Gallery

The Seismic Seat

The Seismic Seat — A ride-on shaker seat that mimics the motion of various seismic events, all while guests are safely seated in your venue. Created in partnership with the Global Security Nuclear Nonproliferation and Security program office at Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Seismic Seat is the focal point for “Explosion Detectives” an exhibit about ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring and the work undertaken by Lab researchers to detect nuclear explosions around the world. This offering is currently in production and will be ready to loan in early 2021.

Images of the Seismic Seat, an "in the works" traveling exhibit.

Women in LANL Computing

Women in Computing —A multitouch, motion-based interactive Ideum Portrait Wall depicting the historic contributions made by women in the field of computing at Los Alamos. Travel along a digital timeline to learn about how computing work at the Lab began with human computers, often spouses of Project Y scientists, and discover how this work led to the supercomputing capabilities of today. Meet some of the women who pioneered the development and advancement of computing methods and technologies in use today.

A preview of "Women in LANL Computing," a new traveling exhibit.