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Brenda Dingus receives Mexican Physical Society Medal

The award honors her developments for physics in Mexico, particularly her work establishing the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory and her ongoing work on the project.
March 26, 2018
Brenda Dingus

Brenda Dingus

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The medal is the society’s highest distinction and recognizes notable contributions by Mexican scientists or foreigners to the development of particle and field physics in Mexico.

The Mexican Physical Society’s Division of Particles and Fields has given Brenda Dingus of the Laboratory's Neutron Science and Technology group the 2017 Medal. The award honors her developments for physics in Mexico, particularly her work establishing the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory (HAWC) in the state of Puebla, Mexico and her ongoing work on the HAWC project.

The medal is the society’s highest distinction and recognizes notable contributions by Mexican scientists or foreigners to the development of particle and field physics in Mexico.

Dingus’s achievements

Dingus, who has more than two decades of experience in gamma-ray astronomy, has been involved in some of the field’s most important discoveries. She has conducted pioneering work in gamma-ray bursts and made contributions to the relatively young field of very high-energy gamma-ray astronomy.

Dingus was the DOE principal investigator and managed the construction of HAWC. She has held two two-year terms as the project’s U.S. spokesperson. From 2010 to 2014 Dingus led the HAWC collaboration team – comprising 140 scientists from 23 United States and Mexican institutions. Her vision, leadership, and management made the Laboratory an internationally recognized leader in observational astrophysics and part of a wider network of land- and satellite-based telescopes probing the universe to answer fundamental questions.

Dingus received a Ph.D. in experimental cosmic-ray physics from the University of Maryland – College Park. Prior to coming to Los Alamos in 2002, she was a tenured professor first at the University of Utah and then at the University of Wisconsin. Dingus has received numerous awards and honors including a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, a Los Alamos Distinguished Performance Award, and is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and Los Alamos National Laboratory. 

About the Mexican Physical Society

The Mexican Physical Society (Sociedad Mexicana de Física, in Spanish) is a non-profit organization founded in 1951 to promote research and teaching in physics, to foster interest in science and especially physics among people in Mexico, and to establish close links with similar organizations within Mexico and abroad. The society has 1,400 members and 13 topical divisions.

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